Acworth meetinghouse crane

Kitchen of the Community

New Hampshire Preservation Alliance recently released an inspiring video about the restoration of the Acworth Meetinghouse. Built by Elias Carter in 1821, the Acworth Meetinghouse, with its double lantern spire, is a masterful representation of historic building craft. In 2008, the steeple and undercarriage were repaired by local craftspeople trained and supervised by PTF in techniques unique to steeple repair,…

Church on the Hill - Maine Steeples Project

Maine Steeples Project

The Maine Steeples Project provides crucial support to the communities that are preserving Maine’s most iconic structures.  A collaborative effort of Maine Preservation, the Maine Community Foundation, and a donor-advised fund, the foundation matches community-raised funds and provides professional guidance.  From their newly-updated website: The Maine Steeples Project supports local efforts to assess and restore…

In the shop, Seth fitting brace tenons

New Castle Gaze Bo

Preservation in the field can take many forms.  Most of the time, preservation is the most practical and reliable answer to a client’s needs, but there are times when pure preservation isn’t feasible, or reasonable (see Demeritt-O’Kane).  The New Castle Congregational Church and gazebo offers an alternate model.  The congregation has endeavored to preserve the…

Trim Time

These past few weeks, with the inclement weather, the York Congregational trim has kept us busy in the shop. Using a steam box, we carefully scraped the lead paint from the trim pieces, made dutchman repairs, and filled nail holes with West System epoxy. We were able to repair 90% of the scroll-shaped trim that…

Face Lift for an Old Girl

We have begun replacing the clock faces of the First Parish Congregational Church in York, Maine.  Formed in 1636, the congregation is the oldest in Maine.  The current building was built in 1747, and moved to its position, facing the road, in 1888. It is time for this old girl to get a face lift. …

Our Biggest Fan

In 1900, Charles Goodhue drew this sketch from the memory of an elderly parishioner.  This is one of the only remaining images that depict the building from this era.  Fortunately, evidence within the building has proven this sketch to be remarkably accurate. From the beginning of our involvement in the project, we have been looking…